COVID-19 Vaccines – What you need to know and do before getting one

Reading Time:- 5 mins

This blog is designed to inform and provide some advice regarding the different vaccines on offer in Australia, and to advise those wishing to get a vaccine on the best course of action to minimise side effects and ensure a successful outcome

Table of Contents

Share on facebook
Share on twitter

This blog is in no way putting forward a case for or against the vaccine. As many people in Australia are likely to be getting a vaccination over the coming months, this is designed to inform and provide some advice regarding the different vaccines on offer in Australia, and to advise those wishing to get a vaccine on the best course of action to minimise side effects and ensure a successful outcome of protection against infection.

There are 2 main vaccines on offer in Australia.

Pfizer/BioNTech

  • In Australia this will firstly be given to priority groups
  • It uses mRNA which go into your cells and instruct your cells to produce the spike proteins of the corona virus. Immune cells then display this spike protein to the body so it can recognise it and produce an immune resistance to it. It is then said to leave the body after 4 days.
  • It needs to be given in 2 doses, 21 days apart
  • It contains polyethylene glycol as an adjuvant to assist the mRNA to get into our cells. This is the part of the vaccine that susceptible people can sometimes have an immediate allergic reaction to which is why you should stick around to be monitored for at least 15 minutes after your vaccination.
  • Is claimed to be 95% effective
  • 1 in 20 people may still get symptomatic infection of COVID-19 but it appears to be of a reduced severity

AstraZeneca / Oxford

  • This one is what most Australians will get and is the one we are producing here.
  • It uses a viral vector which means a modified version of a different virus is injected. It then enters our cells and causes them to produce pieces of the spike protein. Immune cells then displays this spike protein to the body so it can recognise it and produce an immune resistance to it
  • It is thought this vaccine isn’t as effective for people over 55 years of age.
  • It needs to be given in 2 doses, 28-96 days apart
  • It contains polysorbate 80 which can induce inflammation producing symptoms of migraine and hypotension. People susceptible to migraines should supplement with vitamin C and bioflavonoids before vaccination to reduce the likelihood of this happening.
  • It is claimed to be 67% effective
  • 1 in 3 people may still get symptomatic infections of COVID-19 but it appears to be of a reduced severity

Other things you should know

  • There are another 66+ vaccines in phase 3 trials and many more in earlier stages of development
  • You are less likely to have an adverse side effect if you have your vaccine in the morning. This is because cortisol levels are higher at this time of day and cortisol is anti-inflammatory.
  • Vaccines often don’t work as well in people who are obese or over 65 years of age
  • Antibiotic use alters your microbiome (gut bacteria) and this can adversely affect the response to vaccinations. This also goes for people taking numerous pharmaceutical medications, metformin, proton pump inhibitors (such as Nexium to reduce reflux), laxatives and anti-depressants. If you are on these medications it’s a good idea to take a good probiotic in the weeks before and after vaccination.
  • Getting good sleep after your vaccination helps ensure a more positive immune response and better protection. This is due to the sleep hormone, melatonin’s positive influence on the immune system.
  • It takes at least 2-3 weeks for any protection to kick in after the first dose. During this time you are just as vulnerable.

What you can do prior to getting a Covid vaccine

  • Do not have a big night the night before having a vaccine. Alcohol, smoking and inadequate sleep will increase your likelihood of experiencing side effects or an adverse reaction
  • It’s probably a good idea to avoid or delay immunisation if:

o You have uncontrolled autoimmune conditions or other inflammatory processes going on
o If pregnant
o If been unwell recently and are still recovering. (If you’ve had Covid, wait 3-6 months before having the vaccine).
o If you’ve been under a lot of stress lately or been sleeping poorly. I can help you correct these.

  • Ensure you reduce stress, eat well, get adequate sleep, spend time in nature and exercise regularly in the lead up to the vaccine
  • There is plenty of evidence to support the use of immune supportive supplements in the weeks before a vaccine such as Vitamin C, D and zin plus plenty more. I can individually advise you here. Ideally at least 2 weeks before your vaccine.
  • I will be providing personal pre-vaccine check-ups to specifically support you. Book here for a short online consult with me. It will take 10-15 mins and cost $25.

References

https://www.australia.gov.au/covid19vaccines
https://www.australia.gov.au/healthfaqs
https://www.tga.gov.au/covid-19-vaccines
https://www.ifm.org/news-insights/covid-19-vaccines-in-phase-3-trials
https://www.ifm.org/news-insights/good-sleep-hygiene-may-help-protect-infectious-diseases
https://www.ifm.org/news-insights/lifestyle-practices-for-strengthening-host-defense

Disclaimer

This resource is only intended to identify nutraceutical and botanical agents that may boost your immune system. It is not meant to recommend any treatments, nor have any of these been proven effective against COVID-19. None of these practices are intended to be used in lieu of other recommended treatments. Always consult your physician or healthcare provider prior to initiation.

Click button for a pdf version of this article

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *